Our Top 4 Must Reads from October 2014

Our Top 4 Must Reads Last Month

Ranking near the top of our day-to-day tasks is the research we do for our investment strategy. Within this process, we discover many thought-provoking pieces that communicate a topic in a unique or unconventional way.  Many of these articles we share on our social media sites, but we know not all our clients are using those networks, so we want to begin sharing here as well. So here is a list of four of the best things we read last month:

 

Common Sense Thoughts on Stock Market Losses – Discusses the psychology of a stock market drop and how every new drop feels like the first time all over again.  He digs in to how emotional decisions will eventually lead to terrible performance.

 

Diversification Sucks – What do we normally like to compare our portfolio to? The best performing index unfortunately. This article summarizes the unsettling feeling that you have with a diversified portfolio. This strategy will always have some losers but inevitably, those are likely where the best value lies going forward. The author does a nice job of capturing how we feel when investing with a diversified strategy and why it is so hard to maintain patience during periods of weakness.

 

Free Banking on a Bitcoin Standard– The author has a nice description of our current monetary system and how economic expansion works in our capitalist structure. He contrasts this with the potential outcomes for Bitcoin and why it will be difficult for it to ever have a monetary takeover of our conventional monetary system.  This one is a little longer read but has some great insight.

 

Americans OK With Tax Hikes To Protect Social Security – This article describes the far reaching support there is for Social Security across all political affiliations and generations. Wander in to a conversation about Social Security with millennials and you’ll hear someone inevitably say, “I doubt we’ll ever see Social Security.” But more than half of that group, 61%, oppose any cuts to the program. The article goes on to describe other surprising figures in the survey and thoughts on why scaling back the program is a tough sell.

   

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